Category: Psychology

Round-shouldered psyches: Part 2, Do it in DUMBO?

4 February, 2014 (09:00) | Apartments, Architects, Cities, Design, High-rise, Housing, Innovations, Micro-housing, New York City, Psychology, Rent control, Urban life |

 [Continued from yesterday's Part 1.]   By:David A. Smith                                                                           To my surprise, yesterday’s little post on the psychological risks of living in a micro-apartment, using as source material an interesting article in The Atlantic (December 13, 2013),  expanded so much it didn’t fit in the original slot, so I’ve carried it over.   Fun […]

Round-shouldered psyches: Part 1, Enough room for the fridge?

3 February, 2014 (14:43) | Apartments, Architects, Cities, Design, High-rise, Housing, Innovations, Micro-housing, New York City, Psychology, Rent control, Urban life |

By:David A. Smith                                                                           Would you live here?   Micro-apartment designed by Beriot, Bernardini Arquitectos   Every apartment looks spacious […]

Emotional incumbency: Part 2, reasons we like staying

4 November, 2011 (11:17) | Apartments, Cities, Homeownership, Improvability, Moving, New York City, Psychology, Rent control, Rental, US News |

[Continued from yesterday's Part 1.]   By:David A. Smith   Yesterday’s post on people who lived an extremely long time in a single apartment, taken from this picaresque New York Times article, identified three reasons that people dislike leaving their nest: the hassle of moving, the loss of (often undeserved) rent bargain, and anxiety about […]

Emotional incumbency: Part 1, reasons we dislike leaving

3 November, 2011 (09:00) | Apartments, Cities, Homeownership, Improvability, Moving, New York City, Psychology, Rent control, Rental, US News |

By: David A. Smith   A part of each of us is lazy.  Another part of us loves the familiar, simply because we know it well – and so we stay in one place much longer than a perfectly rational economist would have us do, through thick and thin, as profiled in this picaresque New […]