Category: Hajj

The invisible army: Part 6, Revolutions always begin in cities

3 December, 2013 (13:06) | Economics, Global news, Hajj, Housing, Immigration, Informality, Jeddah, Law, Remittances, Saudi Arabia, Social media, Social welfare, Speculation |

[Continued from yesterday’s Part 5 and the preceding Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4.]   By:David A. Smith   For all that I have worked a little in Saudi Arabia, I know that I do not understand the country, nor the socioeconomic dynamics of its culture and the relationship between the Saudi citizens and […]

The invisible army: Part 5, Tinder and sparks

2 December, 2013 (09:00) | Economics, Global news, Hajj, Housing, Immigration, Informality, Jeddah, Law, Remittances, Saudi Arabia, Social media, Social welfare, Speculation |

[Continued from yesterday’s Part 4 and the preceding  Part 1, Part 2, and  Part 3.]   By:David A. Smith   As chronicled so far in this lengthy post, Saudi Arabia is a country without a comparable in my experience: it is a combination of an extractive-based economy, a harsh and forbidding climate that limits urbanization to […]

The invisible army: Part 4, Omnipresent and invisible

29 November, 2013 (09:00) | Economics, Global news, Hajj, Housing, Immigration, Informality, Jeddah, Law, Remittances, Saudi Arabia, Social media, Social welfare, Speculation |

[Continued from yesterday’s Part 3 and the preceding Part 1 and Part 2.]   By:David A. Smith   As we’ve seen up to now, Saudi Arabia’s urban society operates through the labor and services of millions of foreign workers, whose numbers are so vast that they are virtually omnipresent, and are encountered more or less continuously throughout […]

The invisible army: Part 3, Billions in, billions out

27 November, 2013 (09:00) | Economics, Global news, Hajj, Housing, Immigration, Informality, Jeddah, Law, Remittances, Saudi Arabia, Social media, Social welfare, Speculation |

[Continued from yesterday’s Part 2  and the preceding Part 1.]   By:David A. Smith   As we saw in the two preceding parts, Saudi Arabia’s economy depends on the nine million or so legal guest workers the kingdom employs, and another one to two million (possibly more?) illegal residents who have overstayed their welcome but […]

The invisible army: Part 2, Nine out of ten Saudi-citizen workers

26 November, 2013 (09:00) | Economics, Global news, Hajj, Housing, Immigration, Informality, Jeddah, Law, Remittances, Saudi Arabia, Social media, Social welfare, Speculation |

[Continued from yesterday’s Part 1.]   By:David A. Smith   Yesterday’s post brought us to Saudi Arabia, a nation that prospers on oil revenue and runs on the labor and services of roughly nine million foreign workers, mostly South Asians.  As part of this ecosystem, the Saudis enjoy a welfare-state lifestyle and experience high unemployment […]