Category: FHA

Uh-oh, FHA’s ailing

24 February, 2010 (13:50) | FHA, Finance, HUD, Subprime, TARP, US News |

By: David A. Smith   When everyone else gets sick, even the healthy start having symptoms too.   Oh, I should never have gorged on those ’07 and ’08 loans   As one of only three stores left open, still selling single-family and multifamily long-term financing, the Federal Housing Administration – the GSE from the […]

Big, bad banks: Part 2, too bad to fund?

15 October, 2009 (10:27) | Capital markets, FHA, Global news, Subprime, US News, World Bank | 1 comment

By: David A. Smith   [Continued from yesterday’s in Part 1.]   In yesterday’s post, we compared the public pronouncements of two enormous governmental lenders whose financial viabiltiya nd liquidity are in question: FHA in the US, from the New York Times (in plain text) and the World Bank, from the UK Telegraph (in indigo […]

Big, bad banks: Part 1, too big to fail?

14 October, 2009 (10:07) | Capital markets, FHA, Global news, Subprime, US News, World Bank |

By: David A. Smith   Can a government bank fail?    Something a little less visible than that   In the space of a week, that question’s surfaced about two governmental banks – FHA in the US and the World Bank – in stories in the New York Times (which I’ll excerpt in plain text) […]

Liberally prudent or imprudently liberal? Part 2, how we’ll get out of it

15 September, 2009 (09:49) | Capital markets, Default, FHA, GSEs, Hard debt, Housing, US News |

 By: David A. Smith   [Continued from yesterday’s Part 1].    Yesterday’s post dismantled a slightly fear-mongering Wall Street Journal suggesting that FHA’s net worth would fall below the statutorily mandated 2%, and if so, that FHA would need a ‘bailout.’  In fact it does seem that FHA’s portfolio is under stress, with delinquencies up […]

Liberally prudent or imprudently liberal? Part 1, how we got here

14 September, 2009 (10:57) | Capital markets, Default, FHA, Hard debt, Housing, US News |

  By: David A. Smith   Every lender faces the challenge of setting credit policies: tight but not too tight.   That’s too tight   Too tight and the lender loses market share.  Not tight enough and the additional market share acquired turns into loan losses that sink the lender.   A public-policy lender faces […]