Category: Atlanta

End of an error: Part 3, proving it by doing it

1 July, 2009 (10:45) | Atlanta, Innovations, Public housing, Tenure, Theory |

[Continued from yesterday's Part 2 and the preceding Part 1.] So far in this three-part post, using as our text this New York Times story, we’ve followed the Atlanta Housing Authority’s fifteen-year quest to reverse the public-policy error of excessively large purely public housing properties with deep income concentration and physical isolation. Now the Atlanta […]

End of an error: Part 2, envisioning the essential future

30 June, 2009 (11:29) | Atlanta, Innovations, Public housing, Tenure, Theory | 1 comment

Continued from yesterday’s Part 1.] Earlier this year, as we saw yesterday via this New York Times story, the Atlanta Housing Authority has accomplished an impressive feat: it ended a 73-year policy detour by tearing down the last of its original Depression-era public housing, not because it wanted to exit from the business of housing […]

End of an error: Part 1, demolishing the inessential past

29 June, 2009 (11:37) | Atlanta, Innovations, Public housing, Tenure, Theory | 2 comments

When seeking to house the poor, we have two macro-level choices on assistance-basing: We know that’s the goal, which way do we do it? 1. Place-based. Build quality apartments and move people in to those apartments. 2. People-based. Give people subsidy that enables them to make effective choice and find apartments in the market. Neither […]