Category: Archeology

It is for us the living, rather: Part 3, Shall not perish from the earth

19 December, 2014 (10:00) | Archeology, Cemetery, Development, Easement, Encumbrance, Hartland, Homeownership, Housing, Land use, Title, Vermont, Zoning | No comments

 [Continued from yesterday’s Part 2 and the preceding Part 1.] By: David A. Smith We here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain During yesterday’s Part 2, Mr. Guite prevailed in court (back in 2011) and proceeded to relocate the cemetery. Bringing in the University of Vermont’s Consulting Archeology department to […]

It is for us the living, rather: Part 2, We cannot consecrate

18 December, 2014 (10:00) | Archeology, Cemetery, Development, Easement, Encumbrance, Hartland, Homeownership, Housing, Land use, Title, Vermont, Zoning | No comments

[Continued from yesterday’s Part 1.] By: David A. Smith It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. In yesterday’s Part 1, we encountered Michel Guite, for several decades a part-time resident of Hartland, Vermont, who bought a quarter-square-mile plot of land in the middle of which was located a tiny (0.025 acre) […]

It is for us the living, rather: Part 1, To be dedicated here

17 December, 2014 (10:00) | Archeology, Cemetery, Development, Easement, Encumbrance, Hartland, Homeownership, Housing, Land use, Title, Vermont, Zoning | No comments

By: David A. Smith We have come to dedicate a portion of that field ‘Forever’ is a concept that we human beings use all too cavalierly in ordinary conversation but that when written into a contract (such as a land-use agreement or title deed) reverts to its pure English-language meaning – ‘without end’ – and […]

Recovering the lost urban poor

21 October, 2009 (09:56) | Archeology, Cities, Manchester, Slums | 1 comment

By: David A. Smith Statistics are not stories – but then again, stories are not statistics, and statistics represent the totality of real life. We choose to remember our highlights and lowlights, our moments of intensity – and we choose to forget anything that is drab, commonplace, routine, or redolent of the profane. So, for […]

Deadsville, man

29 December, 2006 (10:43) | Archeology, California, Cemetery, Urbanization |

Should auld acquaintance be forgot?  That’s the question posed, albeit indirectly, by a New York Times story about a Bay Area town that’s really dead at night:   COLMA, Calif., Dec. 3 — Years ago this tiny city’s 18-hole golf course was sliced in half. Last spring the nine-hole course became a shorter nine. Next […]